WHAT YOUTH RECOMMENDS A MONDAY MORNING JOLT EDITION
Mon
15
Sep

Sometimes creativity comes out easily, "like a good hot beer shit," as Bukowski so poetically put it (if you've never listened to this rant, we suggest you start every morning with it). Other times, it's nice to take a quick gander at some creators who are very ahead of their time, doing things just to do them. And Monday morning is the best time to fire up your own inferno for the week ahead. Some things we're digging, just for you, after the jump.

Joyride: A short skate film by William Strobeck

From the sick dude who made Supreme's Cherry (and who's Instagram is better than everyone's) comes a new skate short called Joyride. More antics, ripping and fucking awesome from Sage Elsesser, Sean Pablo, Nakel Smith, Tyshawn Jones, Kevin Bradley, Aiden Mackey, Ben Kadow and appearances from Rieder, Bryan Herman and Mark Gonzales.

Lou Reed The Life by Mick Wall

Mick Wall wrote this book on Lou Reed and it can’t get delivered quick enough. Book club anyone? The books’ jacket descriptions sums it up nicely. Our money is in, the book is on the way:

Lou Reed wrote songs about drugs, squalor, transgressive sexuality, honorable prostitutes, visionary gutter queens and dollar-hustlers. He also wrote some of the most moving love songs of the era, from 'Pale Blue Eyes' to 'Perfect Day'. Always a generation ahead, he would never receive his due until later, when it was almost too late. The Velvet Underground, the group he led under the tutelage of Andy Warhol, were despised in their lifetime. Yet all his greatest solo albums - from Transformer to Berlin to his last, the Metallica-collaboration, Lulu - were considered meagre reflections of his best work with the Velvets.

The story of Lou Reed is full of such contradictions. From the ECT treatment that scarred him at 17, to the 'thoughtful, meditative' figure Bono now recalls. From his three marriages, to his polysexual relationship with various New York characters, most especially Rachel: a transsexual to whom he dedicated 'Coney Island Baby'.

'He was a master,' said David Bowie, in the wake of Reed's death, on 27 October, 2013. In his lifetime he was called, variously, the Godfather of Punk, the High Priest of Glam, and all sorts of similarly tremble-tremble sobriquets. The truth is, Lou Reed began where rock left off. Before him, it was about entertainment. After him, rock was literary, dark, and above all, disquietingly honest. His work belongs not in the same safe place as The Beatles and the Stones, but next to William S. Burroughs, Hubert Selby Jr, Andy Warhol, and Reed's personal mentor, Delmore Schwartz.

Now acclaimed biographer Mick Wall, a lifelong Lou Reed and Velvet Underground fan, brings you the story of the most misunderstood genius in rock.

Berlin by Lou Reed

This is definitely not Transformer, but basically at the peak of his career Lou did the exact opposite of what any normal rock star would do: he wrote an album about some real fucked up people in a doomed marriage. Dominated by speed, dope and hiring themselves out for money in which the children are taken away and the only way out is suicide. Heavy shit but beautiful music. “A film for the ear” Berlin effectively become a masterpiece and the end of his career as a major recording star.

Lurk NYC

This crew do Skate Wise with Alex Olson on Know Wave Radio (which we’re addicted to). They’re site is clean, rad videos, blog format, film photos. Get that shit bookmarked.

Darren Ankenman/ Photographer

We come across so many talented photographers here, but this one recently became our obsession. Darren Ankenman. So, so good. Plow through the site and prepare to melt.

Vice Films presents: All This Mayhem

It’s pretty well known that Vice doesn’t mess around. When they put their resources into a story, you’re going to get it as raw, real and unflinchingly authentic as it is. This new film got our attention featuring legendary skaters and charismatic brothers Tas and Ben Pappas share an intense bond that not only propels them to the pinnacle of their sport, but also proves their undoing in this tragic story of Shakespearian proportions. Coming soon to theaters. Check the trailer.

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